THEME

Ask



  • さつき盆栽花季展 / Satsuki azalea bonsai exhibition

    clandestiinely:

    Alphonse Mucha | The Moon and the Stars

    unexplained-events:

    The Burning Monk- Thich Quang Duc (1963) sat down in meditation position at Saigon. He then poured gasoline all over his body and set himself alight. He maintained his calm meditative position and did not even make a sound while his body burned and then within a few minutes toppled over. His body was consumed but his heart remained intact. It was placed in the Reserve Bank of Vietnam and is called the Symbol Of The Holy Heart.

    He wanted to show people that we can do incredible things when we practice mindfulness. He also wanted to show the world the injustice that was being perpetrated on the Buddhist religion and community by a repressive regime. Needless to say, it worked pretty well and the government softened up on the Buddhist. He is a remarkable symbol of the incredible power the mind holds.

    c0ssette:

    Guillaume Seignac,The Awakening of Psyche (detail) 1904.

    c0ssette:

Guillaume Seignac,The Awakening of Psyche (detail) 1904.

    combdesgarcons:

    Marina Abramovic, Cleaning the Mirror I, 1995

    combdesgarcons:

Marina Abramovic, Cleaning the Mirror I, 1995

    miss-catastrofes-naturales:

    Salvador Dalí

    Declaration of the Independence of the Imagination and the Rights of Man to His Own Madness  +

    miss-catastrofes-naturales:

Salvador Dalí 
Declaration of the Independence of the Imagination and the Rights of Man to His Own Madness  +

    a-state-of-bliss:

    Linda Byrne in Givenchy Fall/Wint 1999

    a-state-of-bliss:

Linda Byrne in Givenchy Fall/Wint 1999

    muchastyle:

    Alphonse Mucha. Design for the indoor stained glass panels of Georges Fouquet’s Bijouterie, Paris, Musée Carnavalet (Carnavalet Museum).

    muchastyle:

Alphonse Mucha. Design for the indoor stained glass panels of Georges Fouquet’s Bijouterie, Paris, Musée Carnavalet (Carnavalet Museum).

    inthemoodtodissolveinthesky:

    Leopold Seyffert, Nude with Chinese Background1919

    inthemoodtodissolveinthesky:

Leopold Seyffert, Nude with Chinese Background, 1919

    lifeunderthewaves:

    Beauty and The Beast
    A female freediver takes in the underwater scene, as a lemon shark slowly swims by
    Photograph by Raul Boesel
    lifeunderthewaves:


Beauty and The Beast


A female freediver takes in the underwater scene, as a lemon shark slowly swims by



Photograph by Raul Boesel

    malesoulmakeup:

    Schiaparelli Jacket

    malesoulmakeup:

Schiaparelli Jacket

    Decorative cover of ‘Plant Life.’ Author - Charles A. Hall. Published 1915 by A.C. Black & Co. London.

    Cornell University Library

    archive.org

    
Decorative cover of ‘Plant Life.’ Author - Charles A. Hall. Published 1915 by A.C. Black & Co. London.
Cornell University Library
archive.org

    asylum-art:

    Stunning Anamorphic Artworks That Can Only Be Seen With A Mirror Cylinder

    A year ago, we wrote about Jonty Hurwitz and his amazing anamorphic art that can only be seen in the reflection of a mirrored cylinder. Although the technique was created in the late Renaissance (16th century), artist like Jonty and István Orosz made it popular again.

    What’s interesting about these anamorphic pieces is that most of them look like rubbish without a mirror cylinder. Some of them are so distorted that you can only guess at what the reflected image will reveal. You could probably even use this technique to pass a message on to a fellow secret agent.

    Hurwitz says he creates his art by scanning a three-dimensional object and then using special software to come up with new physical forms, but each artist has their own technique.

    12.  by Jonty Hurwitz
    3.4.5.  by  István Orosz
    6. by  imgur
    7. by Vera Bugatti
    8. by Awtar Singh Virdi
    9. byWilliam Kentridge
    10. by István Orosz

    Via: .boredpanda

    I like to see people reunited, maybe that’s a silly thing, but what can I say, I like to see people run to each other, I like the kissing and the crying, I like the impatience, the stories that the mouth can’t tell fast enough, the ears that aren’t big enough, the eyes that can’t take in all of the change, I like the hugging, the bringing together, the end of missing someone.

    — Jonathan Safran Foer, Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close (via larmoyante)

    fer1972:

    Beautiful Needlework Creations by Louise Saxton